Developing a land ethic

My most recent research project focuses on Tribal management of federally held lands. Not just lands held in trust, but lands which are managed by a federal agency but considered sacred by Tribal people. As a result of the recent appropriation of lands held sacred by the San Carlos Apache, my worst fears about the agendas of politicians are confirmed. Not that this is new information in Indian country. I’m just catching up to the party.

In an effort to explore this issue, I have to acknowledge that the majority of Americans are woefully unaware of the political, legal, genocidal history of government interactions with American Indian Tribes.They THINK they know, but they don’t.

I know that place. I was there. I thought I knew the history and the extent of the damage we had done. I thought it was all ‘in the past’ and that the recovery process had begun. Then I started reading, studying, and listening which led to a lot of crying and soul-searching. Now, I can’t stand silent. I won’t stand silent. I will do what I can, with what I have, from where I’m at, to shine light on the atrocities still being committed.

I’m reading several books. Vine Deloria Jr’s Spirit and Reason. Thomas King’s The Inconvenient Indian. Robert A. Williams, Jr.s Savage Anxieties. Walter Echo-Hawk’s In the Light of Justice. To name a few. Daniel Wildcat’s Red Alert is also very informative.

What these men (interestingly) all seem to point to, either outright or subtly, is the need for a land ethic. This concept is where I think I will launch the dive. What would it mean to have a land ethic? Whose ethic would that be? Is it possible that we could agree on an ethic? Whose voices would be heard?

My fears are that money and power are so out of balance in the application of law and policy that the only voices that would be heard would be those of corporate entities. We are 5 years into Citizen’s United and there seems to be no will to change it anytime soon from a policy or legal viewpoint. Honestly, without the groundswell of average people making significant noise, policy makers aren’t going to stand up to their corporate patrons. There is a swelling, but it ebbs and flows. When it ebbs, the corporate patrons enact strategies that they have spent years perfecting and staging. Cynicism aside, it really means that we have to understand what the obstacles are, at every level.

In the spirit of hope, with a belief in the goodness of people, and a knowledge of the criticality of the task of developing a land ethic, let the work begin. My voice is just one. “Many hands make light work.”

Perhaps we begin by developing the idea of a land ethic, with the politics and the wolves ‘parked’ to the side until we are clear about what we want our forests, streams, lakes, seas and air to look like moving forward. That is, to not ignore the impact of the politics and corporate patrons, but to put them in the hallway while we set the dinner table. Who will be at the table initially? To my mind, Tribes are first on the list. Mostly because the lands we are talking about are critical to their daily lives, not only spiritually but practically.

I have a lot of work ahead of me. Not the least of which is maintaining focus, organization of thought and stamina. It’s not going to be pleasant, and I must work diligently to not become overly-cynical. But I know that I must follow through with this work.